The Written Word in Every Form

I must confess I am a magazine addict.  I love the feel of the paper, the crisp snap as the page turns, the vivid photographs and articles that can expose me to something I never considered. 

My addiction is my mother’s fault.  When I was a little girl, I devoured books and to feed my need my mother provided me magazines. Seventeen, YM, Sassy, Teen Beat, Tiger Beat to name a few.  Her idea was that I would grown up and maybe get a job at one.  Well, I’ve had a few stories published and that’s all.  My addiction, thought, hasn’t gone away.  I don’t think there is a cure.

I receive Vogue, Vanity Fair, Elle, Romantic Times, Writer’s Digest, Marie Claire, Glamour, Cosmopolitan, The Writer and as a free gift OK.  Now take a breath.  I confess that I’m showing control since I’ve cut back.  I once received W, Tatler, Economist, New Yorker, New York, and Time.   Oh and I read them — each magazine, every article even the Letters from Readers.
It clears my mind and soothes me.  While reading a magazine, I usually have a pen and pad near since many times, an idea pops in my head or helps me fix the ones I have had. 

With e-magazines available, I tested a few titles, purchasing Rolling Stones with Adele on it and Tatler as well as True Romance and True Love.  I must say that I’m still pleased though the sensory details such as smell, touch and sound are gone and replaced with extra content, the experience is still a pleasant one.

However, I still love getting my favorite magazine, Vogue, in the mail.  For me, I get a whirling-like sensation as if I received the Christmas gift I wanted.  Not that I jump up and down in front of my mailbox like some crazed fool.  I get giddy.  Hey, I’m a magazine addict.  So is there any others out there like me? Is there any magazines or subscriptions of any kind that you get excited about?  Share all please. 

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Female Friday

In honor of Prince William and Kate’s April wedding, I’ve dedicated this month’s Female Friday to queens. 

             Queen Lili’uokalani
  
Lili’uokalani was the last monarch of the Kingdom of Hawai’i.   She was born on September 2, 1838.  She was educated at the Chiefs’ Children School and became fluent in English. In 1877, three years after Kamehameha V died without an heir, Lili was created Crown Princess and heir to the throne.  Much as European thrones had intrigue surrounding the crown so did Hawaii.  During her trip to Europe as delegates for Hawai’i, she attended Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee where she learned of the Bayonet Constitution, which American, European and Elite Hawaiians forced King Kalakaua to sign the transfer of power from the monarch to the businessmen.  All for the control of the sugar trade.

On January 29 1891 Lili inherited the throne. She struggled to construct a new constitution that returned power to the monarch.  It was never to be.  The businessmen opposing such a measure organized to depose her because she didn’t support the Bayonet Constitution though these men seemed more worried that a woman ruled.  

Lili was kicked off her throne on January 17, 1893.  The US government and President Grover Cleveland proposed to return her throne  if she granted amnesty to all parties involved.  She refused, some say because she wanted to behead those guilty parties but others say, she wanted them punished.   In 1894, the Republic of Hawai’i was created.  The United States government recognized the country.


In 1895, Lili’uokalani was arrested after a failed Counter-Revolution when firearms were found at the base of Diamond Head.  She was sentenced to five years of hard labor in prison and fined $5000.  She actually served it in a bedroom of ‘Iolani Palace.  During her time, she composed songs and penned her memoirs.  She is the first Native Hawaiian female author. But it was music that spoke to her heart.  She played guitar, piano, organ, ‘ukulele and zither.  She sang Hawaiian and English songs.  She helped keep the Hawaiian songs from being lost in time, banished under the washing of a culture. During this time, she abdicated her throne for release and so her jailed supporters were not executed.



She received a full pardon and had her civil rights restored.  A year into the twentieth century, Republic of Hawai’i became the Territory of Hawai’i.  She sued the US government seeking compensation but was unsuccessful.  Though no longer queen she still helped Hawai’i.  Today, the islands are a blend of cultures and peoples.  And Lili’ uokalani supported Buddhist and Shinto priests.  Another first for her, she attended Vesak Day, Budda’s birthday.  


At 79, she died from complications of a stroke.  She willed that her possessions and properties were to be sold and the funds would go to Queen Lili’uokalani Children’s Trust to help orphaned and indigent children, which is still in existence.  

Hawai’i is my home and Lili’uokalani is my queen.  

In My Opinion…

Many bloggers review books, some are scathing in their word choice and others are more amicable. However book reviewing is one aspect of blogging I don’t take part of. Why? I don’t know if I’m tender with people feelings and buy into that adage “if you have nothing nice to say don’t say anything at all.” I may also add a dash of everyone likes different things to that. Don’t get me wrong there are books I hate or books I dislike, some I’ve throw across the room and some I tossed aside never to pick up again unless to add to the donate pile.

But another part of reviewing books, I don’t buy into is reviews. I do read the ones I received and so far, I have received constructed criticism, which is helpful to improve my writing. I don’t like all out bashing of a work, either. (Sorry for repeating). Reviews are opinions, based on a person’s background, life experiences, tastes and other factors. As a writer who has received them, there are good and bad reviews and a life lesson I learned about them is if you cheer for the good, you have to listen to the bad ones. And both can lead you down the insane road. I hope I act like Sandra Bullock when she was nominated for an Oscar in The Blind Side and a Razzie in All About Steve. She attended both award shows, accepting them both with a smile, grace and class. That’s the way I wish to behave. I hope I do when the time comes because it will.

I’m not bashing book reviewing blogs because they can help steer the reader to a new author to enjoy and I’ve taken their advice and had fun reading experience. It’s just not my cup of tea. I guess all I saying up here on my virtual soapbox, which wasn’t my intention, keep doing what you do and works for you and I’ll do the same. The world will be a happy place.

All You Ever Wanted To Know Is In A Book

This is a top ten list of the writing books that I believe are invaluable.

1.  Techniques of the Selling Writer by Dwight V. Swain

2.  Creating Character’s Emotions by Ann Hood

3.  The Joy of Writing Sex: A Guide for Fiction Writers by Elizabeth Benedict

4.  GMC by Debra Dixon

5. Roget’s International Thesaurus

6. The Female Brain by Louann Brizendine, MD

7.  The Male Brain by Louann Brizendine, MD

8.  You Just Don’t Understand: Women and Men in Conversation by Deborah Tannen

9.  Manuscript Makeover by Elizabeth Lyon

10.  Self-Editing for Fiction Writer by Browne & King